Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Happy Halloween! Free Halloween Card for You!

I was playing around with ink last week, thanks to being all fired up and inspired by the incredibly talented Raina Telgemeier. I used some nibs, but Raina uses a brush, and talk about mastering your medium! I don't know how she does it, but even her line work with a cheap jumbo marker has a fluid, brushy, lyrical quality.
Raina drawing on the back of some wrapping paper, it still looks like a million bucks!

As you can tell, I'm a huge fan of her work, and you should be, too! If you haven't read SMILE or DRAMA or her adaptations of Ann Martin's Babysitters series, go out and buy them pronto.

The inking I did:

Above are the beginning illustrations of the Pease Porridge nursery rhyme. I wanted these three little scenes to be in some fun, card format, and was looking at all sorts of pop-ups, but man, most pop-ups are expensive to make and mail. This isn't really a pop-up, but it will sit-up, and it mails flat in an A9 envelope which takes standard postage. To make the final artwork you see in the pdf below, I used the scanning and sandwich method of ink plus digital color as outlined in Matt Madden and Jessica Abel's two DRAWING WORDS & WRITING PICTURES and MASTERING COMICS. I love those books!

If you, too, would like to make a wee Halloween carousel card, this is my cheap, tawdry, home-printer ready version of those lovely old carousel books.

My little Halloween scenes stand up on their own two feet... or pages. 
A real carousel book of Sleeping Beauty from the Smithsonian website.


The first scene

If you have cardstock, you can print on that double-sided, but if you only have regular copy paper, you'll want to glue these onto a heavier piece of construction paper or something. If printing on cardstock and doing the double-sided printing yourself, be sure you put the top of the first side back in correctly so it prints back to back with the top of the second side. You can cut off a 1/4 inch of margin on all outer sides of the paper once they are printed.
The second scene standing up, and a chance to show off my eyeball lights
The third scene
The interior cut marks on the pdf are a little shy of what you'll need depending on what sort of paper you print on, you can snip the teensiest bit more and test if the pieces lock into place correctly.
The last scene is for you! With space to write a name, or your greeting to a friend! In this case, my dog.

Happy Halloween, everybody! 
I will leave you with spooky air plants which look great with eyeball lights: